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If you start taking your
CPP
at age 65, we estimate your
CPP
income will be $x,xxxx monthly and $8,400 annually.

Did you know: CPP may be the main source of retirement income for many Canadians – but it doesn’t have to be the only source.

An advisor can help you understand the best time to start taking your CPP and see how it fits into your overall retirement plan. Review your results with an advisor.

EXPLORE YOUR RESULTS

Now that you know your estimated monthly CPP income, try adjusting your starting age to see how this affects your results. More info - Adjusting your starting age

Estimated pre-tax income
We estimate that by starting CPP at age X, you’ll have a monthly CPP income of X and a lifetime CPP income of $116,100.
The average person of your age and gender can expect to live to age X.
The amount of your CPP depends on how much and for how long you have contributed and the age in which you would like your pension to start. More info - Adjusting your starting age
Other factors, such as your health, your marital status and whether you have other pensions or retirement savings, can affect your decision about when to start receiving CPP. An advisor can help you understand how these factors can influence your choice.

YOUR NEXT STEPS:

Other sources of retirement income

Find out how registered retirement income funds (RRIFs) and annuities work.

Do you know where your retirement income will come from?
For a more accurate result take a look at the Canadian Retirement Income Calculator.

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Other helpful calculators to try:

Retirement savings calculator
Life expectancy calculator
RRSP calculator

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Many factors can make a difference not only to your CPP/QPP payments, but also to your overall financial security when you retire. An advisor can help you weigh your options and make the choices that are best for you.

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CPP/QPP calculator February 28, 2017
 

If you start taking your CPP at age x, we estimate your CPP income will be $ monthly and $ annually.

Did you know: CPP may be the main source of retirement income for many Canadians – but it doesn’t have to be the only source.

An advisor can help you understand the best time to start taking your CPP as part of your comprehensive retirement plan. Review your results with an advisor.

EXPLORE YOUR RESULTS:
0 per month if starting at age 65

See what happens if you adjust your CPP starting age.

Desired CPP starting age: 65 years old

We estimate that by starting CPP at age 0, you'll have a monthly CPP income of $, and a lifetime CPP income of $.
The average person of your age and gender can expect to live to age X.
The amount of your CPP depends on how much and for how long you have contributed and the age in which you would like your pension to start.
Other factors, such as your health, your marital status and whether you have other pensions or retirement savings, can affect your decision about when to start receiving CPP. An advisor can help you understand how these factors can influence your choice.
FACTORS THAT COULD AFFECT YOUR CPP INCOME:

The age at which you start drawing CPP and your life expectancy aren’t the only factors that can affect your CPP income. Learn more about other factors that could make a difference in your CPP income.

MARITAL STATUS:

EMPLOYMENT STATUS:

WORK RESIDENCY:

OTHER FACTORS:

NO FACTORS THAT COULD AFFECT YOUR CPP INCOME WERE SELECTED.
WHAT YOU TOLD US:
TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF:
  • You belong to: X
  • Gender: X
  • Your date of birth: X
  • Marital status: X
  • Employment status: X
  • Where you've worked: X
  • Where you live: X
  • Desired CPP starting age: X
ASSUMPTIONS:

FACTORS THAT COULD AFFECT YOUR CPP INCOME:

MARITAL STATUS

See how your marital status can affect your CPP pension. Check the boxes beside the items you’d like to include in your personalized printout.

Married or common-law couples in an ongoing relationship may voluntarily share their CPP retirement pensions to reduce their tax bill. Read about CPP pension sharing. Read about QPP pension sharing.
If your spouse dies after having contributed to CPP, you may apply for a one-time, lump-sum death benefit. In 2016, the average CPP death benefit was $2,296.85 and the maximum was $2,500. You may also be eligible for a partial survivor’s pension. Find out more about the CPP survivor’s pension. Find out more about the QPP survivor’s pension.
Credit splitting for divorced or separated couples: The CPP contributions you and your spouse or common-law partner made during the time you lived together can be equally divided after a divorce or separation. If you are married or in a civil union in Quebec, the division will be made automatically; if you’re in a common-law union there, you will have to apply for the division. This may result in lower (if you had contributed more than your partner) or higher (if you had contributed less) CPP payments than you would have received had you not divorced or separated. Your lawyer can help you understand your options. Read more about CPP credit splitting. Read more about QPP credit splitting.

See how your employment status can affect your CPP pension. Check the boxes beside the items you’d like to include in your personalized printout.

Continuing to work, after starting to receive CPP/QPP. If you work while receiving your Canada Pension Plan (CPP) or Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) retirement pension, you may increase your retirement income with a lifetime benefit. For the CPP, this is called the Post-Retirement Benefit (PRB). For the QPP, it’s called the Retirement Pension Supplement. Find out more about the PRB. Find out more about the Retirement Pension Supplement.
Unpaid homemaker or caregiver. If you stopped working or took a part-time job so you could stay home to raise your children, you may be able to use the "child-rearing provision" to increase your CPP benefits. Read more about the child-rearing provision. Read more about contributions to the Quebec Pension Plan.
Significant interruptions to your working life or reduction in your earnings. The longer you pay into CPP and the more you earn during that time, the higher your CPP payments will be when you retire. So any significant interruptions in your working life or reductions in your earnings – such as long periods of unemployment, caregiving, part-time work or attending school – can reduce your eventual CPP income. The CPP drop-out provision partly protects you from employment interruptions or stretches of low income, by automatically dropping 17% (up to 8 years) of your lowest earnings from the calculation of your pension amount. For the QPP, you can drop up to 15% of your lowest earnings. Get more information about the drop-out provision. Get more information about contributions to the Quebec Pension Plan.
Self-employed. If you’re self-employed, your CPP contributions are based on your net business income (after expenses), and you're responsible for making the entire contribution. (Employers and employees split the responsibility for making contributions 50:50.) Read more about CPP contributions. Read more about QPP contributions.
Getting close to retirement age (age 55+). Your CPP retirement pension doesn't start automatically – you must apply for it. To apply, you must be at least a month past your 59th birthday and want your CPP retirement pension payments to begin within 12 months. Find out how to apply for CPP. Find out about eligibility for QPP and how to apply.
Early / late retirement (before or after age 65). You can apply for and receive a full CPP retirement pension at age 65, a reduced amount as early as age 60, or an increased amount as late as age 70. (There’s no financial benefit in waiting past age 70.) Read more about how much CPP pension you could receive. Read more about how much QPP pension you could receive.

See how where you’ve worked can affect your CPP pension. Check the boxes beside the items you’d like to include in your personalized printout.

Working outside of Canada. If you've only worked outside Canada, you may qualify for a pension from that country, but you won't qualify for CPP. Your advisor should be able to help you find out where you stand and how to apply for a foreign pension, and help you start saving and planning for other sources of retirement income. Read more about living and working outside Canada. Read more about international social security agreements with the Government of Quebec.
Living and working in Canada. If you've worked in Canada and contributed to CPP for any length of time, you will be eligible for a pension. You must contribute for at least 1 year to be eligible for QPP. The longer you've worked and the higher your salary, the higher your pension will be. Find out more about CPP eligibility. Find out more about QPP eligibility.
Working both outside and inside Canada. If you've worked outside Canada and in Canada, you may qualify for a pension from the other country as well, depending on whether there is a social security agreement between Canada and that country, and the terms of that agreement. Your advisor should be able to help you find out where you stand and how to apply. Read more about living and working outside Canada. Read more about international social security agreements with the Government of Quebec.
If you've never worked in Canada up to now, you won't receive a CPP pension, since you have to work here and contribute to CPP to be eligible. If you were to start working in Canada and contributing to CPP, you would be eligible for a CPP pension when you're ready to retire. If you worked before you came to Canada, you may qualify for a pension from that country. Your advisor should be able to help you find out where you stand and how to apply for a foreign pension, and help you start saving and planning for other sources of retirement income. Find out more about CPP eligibility. Find out more about QPP eligibility.

See how other factors can affect your CPP pension. Check the boxes beside the items you’d like to include in your personalized printout.

CPP enhancements. From 2019 to 2026, the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) will be gradually enhanced. This means you will receive higher benefits in exchange for making higher contributions. The CPP enhancement will only affect you if you're working and contributing to the CPP as of 2019. Read more about CPP enhancements.
QPP enhancements. QPP and CPP are generally aligned, but as of August 2017, no decision had been made about aligning QPP with the CPP enhancements planned for 2019 to 2026. Read more about QPP enhancement.